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Did you know?...
Did you know.....
  • Suicide is when someone kills themselves
  • When someone feels suicidal they think about killing themselves a lot and worry that they might do it
  • If someone tells you that they are thinking about killing themselves always take them seriously
  • If you ever feel so low or upset that you think about killing yourself, look for help as quickly as possible.

Find Help and Support

LonelyWhat is it?

If a person can no longer see why they should be here, distress will seem unbearable. There may be feelings of self-hatred and believe that you are useless and unneeded. Feelings of rage, shame and guilt are all experienced.

Repeated painful experiences, particularly losses, can lead people to blame themselves, faced with an unbearable situation, unsolvable difficulties, overpowering feelings of guilt, failures or conflicts, not being here anymore is the only option – this is also referred to as feeling suicidal.

Some people may be very clear that they don’t want to be here anymore; they are here or not; they may be thinking of ending it all as a release. If you feel powerless to influence circumstances that are distressing, the idea of ending life may give a sense of being in control again.

Just because somebody wishes they weren’t here doesn’t always mean that they are having suicidal thoughts, feeling this way can be linked to specific situations that if addressed, can stop you feeling this way.

These thoughts don’t always last long but if you do have these feelings you should talk to someone you trust or seek help immediately. Remember, if you are feeling low, unhappy or unable to cope it is nothing to be ashamed of.

What causes these feelings?

It may appear to others that suicide or an attempt at suicide is an impulsive act, especially if a person is misusing alcohol or drugs, or responding to a sudden crisis. More usually though, people wishing they weren’t here will have experienced an increasing sense of hopelessness and worthlessness.

Although thinking about ending it all is quite common, and may occur whatever your age, gender or sexuality, you will be more vulnerable to suicidal thoughts and feelings if you feel incapable of solving the difficulties in your life.

These may include:

• Isolation or loneliness
• The breakdown of an important relationship
• Being bullied at work, home or at school
• Experiencing bereavement or other loss
• Debt problems
• Being in prison
• Pregnancy, childbirth or postnatal depression
• Cultural pressures
• Long-term physical pain or illness
• Doubts about your sexual or gender identity
• Facing discrimination
• A history of sexual or physical abuse

Getting Help

Talk to Someone

Just because somebody wishes they weren’t here doesn’t always mean that they are having suicidal thoughts, feeling this way can be linked to specific situations that if addressed, can stop these feelings. Talking through problems with a trusted adult can help.

Talk to a Doctor The Doctor is most people’s first point of contact with the NHS. Many patients visiting their GP are there for help with emotional difficulties, so the doctor will be used to listening to these types of problems. A doctor can suggest a range of treatments, depending on the nature of a person’s difficulties.